About Costa Rica

Watch for story “Health visits in Costa Rica 2017.” Come and explore with the EW team this bio paradise in Central America.

E Travel & Food

Visit Costa Rica in 2017

Plan your trip into the Central American paradise now during the dry season. The town of Jaco bustles with activity.

jaco nightlife (2).jpgLinks about Costa Rica

Lokal Travel’s Upcoming Epic Trips to the Osa Peninsula

Watch for more links and photos from this Central American paradise.

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Protected: Thoughts on big & brave

The strength to face another day

Today is Feb. 21, 2017, a grey Tuesday in the Midwest, USA. I have my four month anniversary with the AA program, that has changed my life. In the system of AA rewards, I will get a four month coin tomorrow at the ABC round table meeting up in the woods by the stage coach drive.

See story “Anniversaries” on the private therapeutic recovery site.

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Coins of encouragement.

Here is my account from Oct. 21, 2016.

A Rockford ambulance whisked me to Metro Health Emergency Center in Grand Rapids, Michigan on a Friday afternoon on Oct. 21. My husband Ludek thought I was having a stroke.

I passed out with a tunnel vision encircled by a wreath of stars.
“What’s your name?” the emergency personnel kept asking me.
I knew my name, I just didn’t know what was going on.

The strength to face another day

By Emma Palova

Lowell, MI- I had to take a break from writing my own EW Emma’s Writings http://emmapalova.com blog because I was working on a client brand new podcast website Americas Community Voices Network from Tampa, Florida.

The ambitious project was plagued by everything possible you could think of: from novelty of the British Podcast Websites, still under development and changing, to Hurricane Matthew and sicknesses on both sides, the clients’ and my own.

When I finished the podcast website on Friday Oct.21 around 2 p.m., I was totally drained, exhausted and dehydrated. My energy level was zero. I could hardly stand up from the computer. I was shaking with cold and my hands were sweating.

The road to the Franciscan Life Process Center.

Fall on Downes Road, my regular walking route.

When my husband Ludek came home from work, my head started to spin. He started disappearing in front of me and instead I saw a dark tunnel encircled by a wreath of stars, kind of like the European Union logo. Then I passed out with my body shaking. My husband thought I was having a stroke.

I woke up in the ambulance close to the Metro Health Emergency Center in Grand Rapids on a Friday evening. All the emergency personnel kept asking me for my name. I knew who I was. But, I didn’t understand what was going on.

“Emma Palova,” I responded.

The emergency staff put at least 50 MediTrace electrodes on me and connected me to the EKG equipment. I was still finding electrodes on me three days later.

“We’re going to pump some liquids into you,” said the technician. “What are you in for?”

And they got the bag of lifesaving IV liquids going into my veins.

After a C-scan of the brain, x-rays and blood work, they rendered different diagnosis such as vasovagal syncope or neurocardiogenic syncope, fainting due to extreme emotional distress. That is a definition according to the Mayo Clinic. And other stuff, that I may or may not write about later.

The emergency doctor prescribed me Oxazepam to get me rid of anxiety and for sleep, so I could finally sleep after weeks of sleepless nights.

Insomnia has been troubling me ever since I can remember.

Five hours later, I got home scared, still exhausted, but relatively alright. I dropped into the bed thankful to my husband Ludek for his fast reaction.

Now, I am recovering from the shock of what had happened. There is a long road ahead of me, but I will not be walking it alone.

Big and brave, Ludek has always been by my side. He never wavered, he never flinched. Just like God.

Thank you for saving me.

Copyright (c) 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

emmapalova

The strength to face another day

By Emma Palova

Lowell, MI- I had to take a break from writing my own EW Emma’s Writings blog because I was working on a client brand new podcast website Americas Community Voices Network from Tampa, Florida.

The ambitious project was plagued by everything possible you could think of: from novelty of the British Podcast Websites, still under development and changing, to Hurricane Matthew and sicknesses on both sides, the clients’ and my own.

When I finished the podcast website last Friday around 2 p.m., I was totally drained, exhausted and dehydrated. My energy level was zero. I could hardly stand up from the computer. I was shaking with cold and my hands were sweating.

When my husband Ludek came home from work, my head started to spin. He started disappearing in front of me and instead I saw a dark tunnel encircled by…

View original post 297 more words

Breast density

Breast density makes detection of cancer harder in 2D mammography

By Emma Palova

Grand Rapids, MI- Being a woman, a mother, a grandmother, a sister and a daughter is a joy. However, the number one risk factor for developing breast cancer is just that; the simple fact of being a woman. Being a woman with a dense breast tissue increases the risk further.

Although dense breast tissue is not an independent risk factor, it can make it harder to find cancer through a traditional two-dimensional (2D) mammography, according to Kent County Medical Society (KCMS) & Kent County Osteopathic Association (KCOA) bulletin.

As of June 1, 2015 breast imaging centers in Michigan are required by law to notify women if they have dense breast tissue.

Breast surgeon Dr. Jamie Caughran

Breast surgeon Dr. Jamie Caughran

“Your mammogram shows that your breast tissue is dense,” will read on the report from the imaging center.

Approximately 50 percent of women undergoing screening mammography have dense breast tissue. Breasts are considered dense if they contain a majority of fibro glandular tissue. Fibro glandular tissue and breast masses appear similar on 2D mammograms, making it difficult to detect a small breast cancer.

Karen Jarrell attested to that in her comment on the WOTV4women “Are you dense?” recent series.

“I had a mammogram in March 2014 that was clean. In December I was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer. Only when diagnosed did I learn I had dense breasts despite having a mammogram routinely.”

If a woman with dense breast tissue is at high risk, as determined by the Gail Risk Score, further screening may be appropriate. A good starting point is a breast cancer risk assessment, according to the KCMS/KCOA bulletin.

“Women need to know the risks in addition to having dense breast tissue,” said Dr. Jamie Caughran, medical director at the Mercy Health Comprehensive Breast Center in Grand Rapids.

Top risks include age, gene mutations, breast cancer is higher among women who have first degree relative with breast cancer (mother, sister or daughter), and personal history of breast cancer three to four fold increases the risk of a new cancer.

The additional screening options include 3D mammography or Digital Breast Tomosynthesis, now available in Kent County. The cutting edge technology produces a conventional 2D mammogram while also acquiring images of individual layers of breast tissue which can be viewed as an aggregate. This diminishes the masking effect of dense breast tissue, compared to the 2D image.

Levels of density

Levels of density

The 3D technology allows the radiologist to more accurately distinguish normal fibro glandular tissue from an underlying mass.

“3D mammography helps in the setting of dense breasts,” said Caughran. “It reduces the chances of screening patients having to come back for additional views and improves our cancer detection for masses in dense breasts.”

Insurance coverage varies. Priority Health and Medicare are covering diagnostic as well as screening. 3D is often performed as part of a diagnostic evaluation for a mass or known imaging finding.

Tomosynthesis (3D) is appropriate for patients with prior mammograms read as heterogeneously dense or extremely dense breasts, patients who are at high risk for developing breast cancer, and for patients who have strong desire to pursue 3D screening but do not fulfill either of these criteria.

The out-of-pocket cost is $150.

In high risk patients, MRI can be performed in addition to the 3D, as well as ultrasound as a side test.

Caughran said she is not in favor of additional 3D on top of a 2D because of double radiation.

“Do one exposure instead,” she said. “Come up with a plan. Know your density and risk level. The lack of coverage shouldn’t be an issue. We have grants and programs to cover.”

Caughran recommends for all women once a year mammogram, monthly self-exams and yearly exams at your doctor.

For more information go to http://www.breastdensity.info

Sources: Kent County Medical Society & Kent County Osteopathic Association (KCMS/KCOA}

 

Cutlines: Dr. Jamie Caughran, breast surgeon and medical director at the Mercy Health Comprehensive Breast Center, Grand Rapids

 

Graf of levels of density:

  1. The breasts are almost entirely fatty.
  2. There are scattered areas of fibro glandular density.
  3. The breasts are heterogeneously dense, which may obscure small masses.
  4. The breasts are extremely dense, which lowers the sensitivity of mammography.

Copyright (c) 2016. All rights reserved, Emma Blogs, LLC

 

Enabling the future

ENABLING THE FUTURE

Full show: Are You Dense? Detecting breast cancer to save your life.

Watch for a story on this in the Ionia Sentinel-Standard.

WOTV4women.com

[anvplayer video=”514639″ /]

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GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.  (WOTV)-  Are you dense? It’s a question WOTV 4 Women and WOOD TV8 have been asking all month long. That’s because a new law took effect on June 1, 2015 in the state of Michigan requiring that women are notified of their breast density with their mammogram results.

This special brings together a series of stories and reports from WOTV 4 Women and WOOD TV8  to give viewers a broad understanding of breast density. We’ve been talking to doctors, radiologists and breast cancer survivors to equip West Michigan women with all of the information they need to understand.

This topic is far-reaching; almost half of all women are estimated to have some form of breast density, which makes it harder to spot breast cancer on an annual mammogram.  Dense breast tissue and cancer both appear white on a mammogram making additional screenings necessary…

View original post 35 more words

New study suggests heart disease research should focus on women

This is very important.

WOTV4women.com

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(WOTV) — A new study suggests much more work needs to be done when it comes to young people and heart disease deaths, and the focus needs to be put on women.

New research shows deaths from heart disease have declined dramatically over the last few decades in people over 65, but that’s not true for people under 55, especially women.

“The next step would be trying to understand why this younger population is not showing the improvement the older patients do,” said Dr. Alexander Gorodnitskiy, cardiologist at Lenox Health in Alabama. “It is because of the traditional risk factors and they’re citing increases in obesity and diabetes, in this population.”

Researchers at Emory University also point out that diabetes and obesity may pose a greater heart disease risk for younger women.

Heart disease is still the number one killer of both men and women in the U.S…

View original post 110 more words

Eyeology with Dr. Verdier

New eyes one year later.

emmapalova

New eyes one year later

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Grand Rapids, MI- It’s been exactly a year since I’ve had surgeries to remove cataracts from both eyes. The process took close to two months at the Verdier Eye Center in Grand Rapids.

In May, I went almost completely blind to a point where I could no longer drive or write because I couldn’t see the computer screen or the windshield. And that’s exactly what a cataract is- a dirty windshield or lights on the car. Some cataracts take years to develop, mine only took two years from the first consultation. They don’t necessarily just strike older people, which is also one of common misconceptions.

Verdier Eye Center Dr. David Verdier, a recognized eye surgeon

I couldn’t see the TV screen, so I couldn’t do my yoga practice. I cried hard. I was afraid I wouldn’t be able to see my son…

View original post 295 more words